WE'VE GOT SMOKED FISH!

Contact George Lang at
509-548-5522

Icicle Conservation Banquet

Saturday,
Sept. 27, 2014

Old News 2010

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Old News 2010

 

Wenatchee Valley Museum 

Friday, Nov. 5, 5-7 p.m. Opening Reception, “Bill McGuire: Fisherman, Sportsman, Craftsman”

Bill McGuire of Rock Island started building fly rods in the 1950s. He still holds the world distance record for spin casting (325 feet) and has guided celebrities like Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Debbie Reynolds and Ted Williams on fly fishing trips. He also is well known around the world for marksman shooting and making specialty gunstocks. This exhibit of photographs and sports memorabilia at the Wenatchee Valley Museum will span 60 years of Bill’s experience as Fisherman, Sportsman and Craftsman. The exhibit runs Nov. 5 through Feb. 19. Bill will be on hand for the opening reception on First Friday, Nov. 5, from 5 to 7 p.m. Museum admission is free all day and hours extended to 7:00. Otherwise, the exhibit is open whenever the museum is open: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 127 S. Mission in Wenatchee; 888-6240.

 

Tuesday, Nov. 9, 7 p.m. History of Fish and Fishing in the Columbia Basin

Dennis Dauble has researched fishes of the Columbia and Snake Rivers for more than 30 years. He currently teaches a course in fish ecology for Washington State University and writes on natural history of fishes for regional publications. His presentation at the Wenatchee Valley Museum will describe how fish and fishing are intertwined with the lifestyle and culture of Pacific Northwest residents, from American Indian tribes and the Lewis & Clark Expedition through modern water and fish resource managers and sports fishermen. The slide show and talk is supported by Humanities Washington’s Inquiring Mind program. Admission is by donation. The museum is located at 127 S. Mission in Wenatchee; 888-6240.

Evening reception and conversation with Robert Glennon
Author of “Unquenchable: America's Water Crisis and What To Do About It”

National water expert and author Robert Glennon is the guest speaker at an event hosted by the Washington Water Project of Trout Unlimited. Mr. Glennon has made numerous appearances on national television and radio shows to discuss his innovative and entertaining research on managing and sharing limited water resources. Join your neighbors and others to hear solutions that connect the dots between water resources, growth, the environment and agriculture.

When: Friday, November 19, 2010

Time: Doors open at 6 PM with refreshments, drinks and an opportunity to meet with local organizations working on watershed restoration activities; Mr. Glennon speaks at 7 PM

Where: Cashmere Riverside Center, 201 Riverside Center, Cashmere, WA
Host: Washington Water Project of Trout Unlimited
No cost to attend, but please RSVP because space is limited.

For more information and to RSVP, contact Jill Wasberg at jwasberg@tu.org or 509-881-5464

Fish Lake Osprey

What a great day with Upper Valley Connection on Fish Lake.

NEWS RELEASE

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
August 20, 2010
Contact: Dennis Beich, (509) 754-4624, ext. 19

Fish and wildlife roundtable Sept. 8 in Brewster

North Central Washington residents can discuss fish and wildlife issues with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Director Phil Anderson and regional WDFW staff in a roundtable meeting Sept. 8 in Brewster.

The meeting is scheduled from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Columbia Cove recreation building, 508 W. Cliff Ave., in Brewster.

Similar sessions are being planned for other areas of the state in coming months.

“I enjoy visiting communities and talking with our stakeholders to get perspectives from as many people as possible about their fish and wildlife interests,” said Anderson. 

The roundtable in Brewster will include discussion of a variety of topics, including Upper Columbia River salmon and steelhead selective-fishing management.

“This roundtable is a good way for citizens to informally discuss issues and get acquainted with department personnel,” said Dennis Beich, WDFW’s regional director for north-central Washington.

 

Fishing Rule Change

WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Salmon fishing opens on the Icicle River

Actions:  Opens salmon fishing on the Icicle River (Chelan County).

Effective dates:  May 13 through July 31, 2010.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Icicle River, from the closure signs located 800 feet upstream of the mouth to 500 feet downstream of the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery Barrier Dam.

Reason for action: In-season run analyses predict that about 11,000 salmon are currently enroute to the Icicle River. Although upper Columbia River spring chinook have been listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the salmon returning to the Icicle River are not listed under the ESA. About 1,000 salmon are needed to meet hatchery broodstock. The 2010 return ensures that the hatchery will meet its escapement needs; the remaining fish will be available for harvest. 

Other Information: Daily limit two salmon, minimum size 12 inches. Night closure will be in effect.  Release fish with one or more round holes punched in the tail of the fish (caudal fin). These fish are part of a study and have been anesthetized; the FDA requires a 21 day ban on consumption of these fish.

Information contact: Art Viola (509) 665-3337, Wenatchee District Office (509) 662-0452; Jeff Korth, Ephrata Region 2 Office (509) 754-4624.

Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license. Check the current WDFW “Fishing in Washington” rules pamphlet or the Fishing section of the WDFW webpage at wdfw.wa.gov for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing regulations are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500; press 2 for recreational rules; call the Shellfish Rule Change hotline, (360) 796-3215, or toll free 1 (866) 880-5431.

# # #

Fishing Trip Video

Good job Des Moines chapter of Trout Unlimited

Nearly 30,000 young coho salmon being raised at Des Moines Marina

April 20, 2010
The Waterland Blog
By Michael Brunk

There’s something lurking under the placid waters of the Des Moines Marina. It’s growing. And it’s hungry! Sea monster? Nope! It’s a school of nearly 30,000 young Coho salmon. The fish are part of a project managed by the Duwamish-Green Chapter of Trout Unlimited and sponsored by the Washington Department of Fisheries, with support from the City of Des Moines and the marina. The fish came from the Soos Creek hatchery in Auburn, and were loaded into a floating pen at the marina in late January. When they’re released sometime in May, the fish will be around a year and a half old. The exact timing of the release will be set by Trout Unlimited chapter president John Muramatsu and project director Darrel Miller. When they determine the fish are ready, two sides of the net that holds them will be dropped and the fish will swim away. According to Trout Unlimited’s Andy Batcho, the fish will return to Des Moines again when they’re about three years old. Unlike wild salmon, fish introduced using a “delayed release” program such as this one won’t migrate to Alaska. Instead, they’ll stay in the Puget Sound and Straits of Juan de Fuca and provide a year-round salmon fishery. I tagged along this past weekend with Trout Unlimited member John Nelson – better known for his role in coordinating the annual Brat Trot and Cove to Clover runs – to observe the evening feeding on Sunday. John brought along a young work crew to help distribute the commercial salmon feed to the young fish. The fish will continue to be fed twice a day, seven days a week until their release in May.

NEWS RELEASE

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
April 28, 2010
Contact: Pat Michael, (360) 902-2628

Pamphlet includes new fishing rules

OLYMPIA – Anglers planning to fish in Washington past the end of the month should be aware that nearly a hundred new fishing rules will take effect starting May 1. The new regulations, affecting everything from catch limits to fishing tackle, are included in the new Fishing in Washington rules pamphlet, published by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) for the 2010-11 season. The free pamphlet will be available later this week at WDFW offices and more than 600 sporting goods stores and other license vendors statewide. It is also posted on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations. “We strongly advise anglers who have been using last year’s fishing pamphlet to pick up a new one,” said Craig Burley, WDFW fish division manager.  “While many regulations remain the same from year to year, some significant changes are about to take effect in fisheries throughout the state this season.” Those changes include nearly a hundred new rules adopted last February by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, a nine-member citizen panel that sets policy for WDFW. Prior to taking action on those proposals, the commission conducted a series of public hearings and considered more than a thousand comments received from anglers and non-anglers throughout the state.

Key changes are summarized on page 11 of the new rules pamphlet. For example:

bullet

 All rivers, streams and beaver ponds in the Puget Sound area are closed to fishing, unless otherwise stated in the rules pamphlet. This approach allows fishery managers to provide greater protection for juvenile anadromous fish in many of the smaller unnamed streams.

bullet

Anglers can now purchase a two-pole endorsement, allowing them to use up to two lines when fishing in most lakes statewide.

bullet

Fishing for all species of rockfish will be closed in most areas of Puget Sound to protect declining populations.

bullet

Harvest of sea stars, shore crab and other “unclassified marine invertebrates” is prohibited to protect these beach dwellers.

bullet

Barbless hooks will be required during salmon fisheries in Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay to protect wild fish.

Burley recommends that anglers check the new pamphlet for any new rules that might apply to their favorite fishing spots. One worth noting is Rattlesnake Lake in King County, which opened to trout fishing April 24 with a five-fish limit, but will switch to a catch-and-release fishery when the new rules take effect May 1. “That’s the kind of change that anglers need to know about,” Burley said. “By checking the new rules, they can avoid surprises in fisheries around the state.”

Washington Council to Meet June 12 at Barn Beach Reserve in Leavenworth

Trout Unlimited members and guests from across Washington will meet June 12 at the beautiful Barn Beach Reserve in Leavenworth for our 2010 Spring Meeting. This year’s Spring Meeting will feature the “Climate Change – Impacts to Trout and Salmon” seminar. Here’s the link to more information about Barn Beach Reserve: www.barnbeachreserve.org/.

The Icicle Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited has once again pulled out all stops to host this annual WCTU business meeting. These fellow TU members secured our meeting facility and they will host our annual pre-meeting barbeque Friday evening (June 11) at Bob Stroup’s home on the Icicle River. In addition, Icicle Valley TU members will make arrangements for catered lunch for us to enjoy Saturday as we hear from Jack Williams (TU’s senior scientist). Local support for a meeting of this nature, scope and importance is vitally important and is truly appreciated.

The Washington Council of Trout Unlimited encourages you to make the trip to Leavenworth to participate in the Friday evening barbeque and the Saturday business meeting. As noted on the meeting agenda, pre-registration for these two events by May 15 is required. The barbeque is free, while the meeting and lunch is $20.00.

 

Here is the sign language for the proposed sign to be installed at the boat launch area on the Icicle River. 

         Welcome to the Lower Icicle River Wildlife Sanctuary

The Icicle River, which flows mostly through private lands, joins the Wenatchee River just above downtown Leavenworth. To protect these two waterways, Chelan County has an ordinance prohibiting using internal combustion engines in them. We want all to enjoy the Icicle experience and ask that you respect the wildlife, landowners, and laws of this area. Just think, if all "Leave No Trace" …..then you may return to the same experience you enjoyed today. We Thank You:

Icicle Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited
Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery
Department of Fish and Wildlife
Chelan County Commissioners

7.20.190 Motorboat restrictions.
(a)  No motorboat, other than boats with electric trolling motors (and boats used for law enforcement and/or rescue purposes), may be used on the following waters:
(1)  Lower Wheeler Reservoir (Black Lake);
(2)  Clear Lake;
(3)  Lily Lake;
(4)  Antilon Lake;
(5)  Icicle Creek, from its confluence with the Wenatchee River;
(6)  Beehive Reservoir;
(7)  The Wenatchee River, upstream from the Wenatchee Confluence State Park Footbridge;
(8)  The White River, upstream from its mouth.
(b)  In addition to the other restrictions in this section, no motorboat, other than boats with electric trolling motors and other electric motors, may be used on the following waters:
(1)  Meadow Lake;
(2)  Three Lakes.
(c)  Reserved for future use.
(d)  The sheriff shall annually prepare and post, at convenient public places adjacent to the lakes listed in this section, public notices which shall specify the specific restrictions applicable to the particular lake.
(1)  Notices shall be posted on the wharf or docks of each boat livery and adjacent to public launching ramps, docks or wharves and at such locations as will reasonably inform the boating public of restrictions.
(2)  Failure of the sheriff to post these notices shall be no defense in a prosecution under this section, but the court may consider this factor in imposing its penalty. (Res. 2009-99, 9/15/09; Res. 2008-66, 3/25/08; Res. 2002-40 (part), 3/18/02; Res. 2001-79, 5/24/01; Res. 89-55 (part), 5/30/89; Res. 85-36, 4/15/85; Res. 79-120 § 20, 9/11/79).

FISHING RULE CHANGE
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, February 19, 2010

 

Columbia River spring chinook seasons

Action: Sets fishing regulations for spring chinook salmon in the mainstem Columbia River. 

Locations:

The mainstem Columbia River from Buoy 10 upstream to the I-5 Bridge.

Effective date: Through April 18, 2010, fishing for salmonids and shad is open 7 days per week, except closed on March 9, 16, 23, 30.

Effective March 1, 2010: Daily salmonid limit is 6 fish (hatchery chinook or hatchery steelhead), of which no more than 2 may be adults and no more than one may be an adult chinook. Release all wild chinook.

The mainstem Columbia River from the I-5 Bridge to the I-205 Bridge.

Effective date: March 1 through March 14, 2010, fishing for salmonids and shad is open 7 days per week, except closed on March 9.

Effective date: March 15 through April 3, fishing for salmonids and shad is open only on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays.

Daily salmonid limit is 6 fish (hatchery chinook or hatchery steelhead), of which no more than 2 may be adults and no more than one may be an adult chinook. Release all wild chinook.

The mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge upstream to Bonneville Dam.

Bank fishing only – closed to fishing for salmonids and shad from boats.

Effective date: March 1 through March 14, 2010. Fishing for salmonids and shad is open 7 days per week, except closed on March 9.

Effective date: March 15 through April 3, 2010. Fishing for salmonids and shad is open only on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays.

Daily salmonid limit is 6 fish (hatchery chinook or hatchery steelhead), of which no more than 2 may be adults and no more than one may be an adult chinook. Release all wild chinook.

Tower Island power lines (located about 6 miles downstream from the Dalles Dam) upstream to McNary Dam, plus Washington bank between Bonneville Dam and the Tower Island powerlines.  

Effective date: March 16 through May 31, 2010. Fishing for salmon, steelhead and shad is open seven days per week.

Daily salmonid limit 6 fish, of which no more than 2 adult chinook salmon or hatchery steelhead or one of each.  Release all wild chinook.

Species affected: Spring chinook, steelhead and shad

Reason for action: Harvestable numbers of salmon are available based on the forecasts and associated management agreements.

Other information: Additional fishing opportunity may be available after the run size is updated in early May. A news release describing the 2010 spring chinook season is available on the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/

Information contact: (360) 696-6211. For latest information press *1010.

Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license. Check the WDFW  “Fishing in Washington” rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing regulations are subject to change. Call the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules or check the WDFW webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fish/regs/fishregs.htm for details on fishing seasons and regulations. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360) 796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431.

Eastern Washington Regional Meeting

March 23 -Tuesday, 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. - Kennewick, WA (Location TBA). Discussion of statewide conservation issues and potential salmon fishing opportunities.

Columbia River salmon, steelhead endorsement will take effect April 2010

OLYMPIA – Starting April 1, anglers who fish for salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River and its tributaries will be required to purchase a new endorsement that will help maintain and improve fishing opportunities throughout the basin. 

The Columbia River Recreational Salmon and Steelhead Pilot Program endorsement was authorized by Senate Bill 5421 during the 2009 Legislative session. The annual endorsement was one of several license fee changes approved by the Legislature earlier this year to help offset a $30 million cutback in state funding for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 

The total charge of the endorsement, after transaction and dealer fees, will be $8.75. The endorsement and recreational fishing licenses for the licensing year that begins April 1, 2010 can be purchased beginning Dec. 1, 2009. 

Funds generated from the endorsement fee will support the evaluation of selective fisheries in the Columbia River Basin, said John Long, WDFW’s statewide salmon and steelhead fisheries manager. Funds also will be used for other management activities, including fisheries enforcement, data collection and monitoring. 

Selective fisheries allow anglers to catch and keep abundant hatchery fish, which are marked with a missing adipose fin, but require that they release wild fish. 

“This program is designed to support current selective sport fisheries for salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River and its tributaries, and – to the maximum extent possible – expand those opportunities in the future,” said Long. 

The endorsement will be required, along with a fishing license, for anglers 15 years of age and older to fish for salmon and steelhead on the Columbia River and its tributaries when open to fishing for those species. 

WDFW, working with the Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Recreational Advisory Board, has proposed a list of rivers, lakes and other waters in the Columbia River basin where the endorsement will be required. That list, available on the department’s website is one of more than 100 proposed sportfishing rules for 2010-12. 

The entire sportfishing rule-proposal package can be found on the department’s website.

This information from Dave Graybill may answer some of your questions.

Frequently Asked Questions: Columbia River Salmon & Steelhead Endorsement

Q: What is the Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Endorsement?
A: The annual endorsement, authorized by Senate Bill 5421 during the 2009 Legislative session, is a new licensing requirement for anglers who fish for salmon and steelhead recreationally in the Columbia River and its tributaries. Anglers must purchase the endorsement in addition to a fishing license to fish for salmon or steelhead in those waters. 

Q: How much money will be generated from the new endorsement?
A: WDFW estimates that the endorsement will generate about $900,000 annually. Funds generated from the endorsement fee will only be used to maintain and improve recreational salmon and steelhead selective fisheries in the Columbia River and its tributaries. Specifically, the fee will support fishery management activities, including scientific monitoring and evaluation, data collection, permitting, reporting, and enforcement. 

Q: Why is the endorsement required?
A: The annual endorsement was created by the Legislature in 2009 to help maintain and improve recreational salmon and steelhead selective fisheries in the Columbia River and its tributaries. Specifically, the fee will support fishery management activities, including scientific monitoring and evaluation, data collection, permitting, reporting, and enforcement. The annual endorsement was one of several license fee changes approved by the Legislature in 2009 that helped offset a portion of a $30 million cutback in the 2009-2011 state budget for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Q: When will this new requirement take effect?
A: The annual endorsement will be required beginning April 1, 2010, and will be valid through March 31, 2011. A new Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Endorsement will be required for each subsequent license year. 

Q: How much will the endorsement cost?
A: The total charge of the endorsement, after transaction and dealer fees, will be $8.75.

Q: Who will need to purchase an endorsement?
A: Any angler 15 years of age or older with a Washington fishing license fishing recreationally for salmon or steelhead in the Columbia River and its tributaries will be required to have an endorsement where these fisheries have been authorized.

Q: Will anglers licensed in Oregon be required to purchase the endorsement?
A: Anglers with an Oregon license are not required to purchase an endorsement if they are fishing from a boat or from the Oregon bank of the Columbia River. However, as always, anglers licensed in Oregon fishing the Columbia River from Washington’s bank and sloughs – except Camas Slough – are required to purchase the appropriate Washington fishing-license documents. 

Q: Will anglers licensed in Idaho be required to purchase the endorsement?
A: Anglers with an Idaho license are not required to purchase an endorsement if they are fishing from a boat or from the Idaho bank of the Snake River. However, as always, anglers licensed in Idaho fishing the Snake River from Washington’s bank and sloughs are required to purchase the appropriate Washington fishing-license documents. 

Q: Where will the endorsement be required?
A: The endorsement will be required, along with a fishing license and a catch record card, for anglers 15 years of age and older to fish for salmon and steelhead on the Columbia River and its tributaries when open to fishing for those species. WDFW, working with the Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Recreational Advisory Board, has proposed a list of waters in the Columbia River basin where the endorsement will be required. The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is scheduled to consider for approval the list of waters, during its February 2010 meeting in Olympia.

Q: What is the Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Recreational Advisory Board? 
A: The Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Recreational Advisory Board was formed in September 2009 to advise WDFW on the use of money generated from the endorsement. Senate Bill 5421 directed WDFW to form the board, which currently has nine members who represent different regions of the Columbia River Basin. 

Q: Where can I buy a license and endorsement?
A: At one of the more than 600 WDFW license dealers throughout the state or online. Dealer locations can be found on WDFW’s website.  

Q: Where can I get more information?
A: Visit WDFW’s website or contact WDFW’s Fish Program at (360) 902-2700 or WDFW’s Licensing Division at (360) 902-2464.

The Icicle Chapter of Trout Unlimited will be represented by a display of promotional material in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center. Also we will be featured in the March Newsletter promoting this performance. I hope to see all of you on Friday, March 12, at the Performing Arts Center in Wenatchee at 7:30 p.m.

The McManus Comedies
A Fine and Pleasant Misery • McManus in Love
Scrambled McManus • Pot Luck • Poor Again…Dagnabbit!
Written by Patrick F. McManus
Starring Tim Behrens

Poor Again…Dagnabbit!
A New Comedy by Patrick F. McManus at the Performing Arts Center of Wenatchee

What: Poor Again…Dagnabbit!, an entirely new Comedy by Patrick F. McManus
Starring Tim Behrens
When: March 12, at 7:30 PM
Where: Performing Arts Center of Wenatchee
Tickets: $21 for Adults; $16 for 12 yrs and under
Purchase: 509-663-ARTS(2787) or 
www.pacwen.org

Nationally renowned humor writer Patrick F. McManus has done it again….become poor! And this time he’s written a new play about it for his even poorer and indentured actor, Tim Behrens. This will be the first play Pat has written for Tim in more than 12 years, and world needs it!

“The worldwide recession continues to increase the spread of laughlessness across the land,” says Behrens, “and we aim to do our part to combat this situation.”

Both author and actor guarantee laughs as they describe Pat’s childhood of poverty, his confrontations with wolves at the door, his inspired descriptions of the Great Depression’s impacts on everything from cars to maggot farming, from school assignments to dating. Discover how to make, and inventively present, poverty foods like blood sausage, head cheese and turkey gravy. And how to build a car from spare parts.

Pat’s account of his current situation…once again falling from success to poverty… culminates in a conversation with Old Ed, Pat’s 100 year-old friend, who puts love and life into perspective …if he can stay awake long enough.

A Book For All Seasons will make all of Patrick McManus' books available at the performance, on March 12, and Patrick McManus will be on hand to meet readers and personally autograph purchases.  One lucky attendee will win accommodations in Innsbrucker Inn's book-themed Patrick McManus room, in Leavenworth, compliments of A Book For All Seasons.

McManus, one of the most popular humor writers in the country, has penned 21 titles which have sold more than 6 million copies. Five of his short humor collections have made the top 10 of the NY Times Bestseller’s list. His five one-man shows, all performed by Behrens, have played to more than 400,000 people in 21 states.

Collections of Outdoor Humor Pieces
A Fine and Pleasant Misery
 (1978)
They Shoot Canoes, Don't They? (1981)
Never Sniff a Gift Fish (1981)
The Grasshopper Trap (
1985)
Rubber Legs and White Tail-Hairs
 (1987)
The Night the Bear Ate Goombaw (1989)
The Good Samaritan Strikes Again (1992)
How I Got This Way (1994
Into the Twilight, Endlessly Grousing (1997)
Real Ponies Don't Go Oink!
 (1999)
The Bear in the Attic (2000)
Kerplunk (
2007)
Never Cry "Arp!" (1997) - a collection for younger readers

Here is the latest in ICTU news

As 2009 closed the ICTU began the 2010 year began with a "bang!" Twelve members of our chapter attended the state meeting in Olympia, Washington, on Jan 9-10. The presidents and executive meetings were held on Friday evening with Dennis McMahon and George Lang attending. On Saturday, Jan 9, the business meeting was attended by a record number of TU members and guests. The keynote speaker was US Congressmen Norm Dicks. He is chairman of the Natural Resources Committee and gave a very interested presentation about some of the legislation that he has succeeded in passing over his tenure in Washington, D.C., highlighted by the mandatory marking of all hatchery fish and the development of better relationships between fishermen and the Native Americans. He also has played a big role in the building of the new Colville Hatchery near Chief Joseph Dam. This hatchery will more than double the run of salmon and steelhead in the upper Columbia River. The WCTU awarded its Conservationist of the Year to Mr. Norm Dicks for his outstanding role in conservation of our cold water fishery in the state of Washington.

We had a very interesting panel discussion on the Chehalis Basin Flood Control Planning with our moderator, Mr. Ric Abett (Chairman of WCTU Chehalis Committee), and our panel of Thurston Grays Harbor, Lewis County, WDFW, WDOE, WDOT, and USACE.

In the afternoon we discussed chapter business and the overall success of TU in the state of Washington. The event of the day was the presentation of awards to the different chapters and individuals through out the state of Washington who have worked tirelessly this past year for conservation of our cold-water fisheries. Our area chapter and individuals brought home three awards.

Mr. Dan Davies received the Sue Derry Memorial Trout Award for outstanding contributions in the protection, enhancement and/or restoration of Washington's trout resource and habitat.

Travis Collier received a Special Award for his work with "Salmon in the Classroom" in the Cascade and Cashmere school districts.

The final award was for our Web Page which was designed by our Webmaster, Janet Wadlington, for the best Web Site in 2009 for the state of Washington. Check the WCTU Web site for pictures and information on the state meeting.

2009 was a very good year for ICTU. We were involved in many partnerships and projects. The Blackbird Acclimation/kids fishing pond was completed and we raised over 50 thousand steelhead smolts and released them into the Wenatchee River system. We also opened the Blackbird Kids Fishing Pond in July for kids to fish for cutthroat trout throughout the summer. We worked with the Chelan County Department of Natural Resources on many riparian projects in the Wenatchee River Basin planting riparian stock in and around the Wenatchee River. 

Our chapter held its annual Family Fishing Derby on Fish Lake in May. In September we participated in the Wenatchee River Salmon Festival at the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery. In September we also held our most successful Conservation at the Festhalle in Leavenworth raising money for scholarships and projects. 

We handed out two grants this year to Whitney West and Dave Rayfield, who are now attending colleges in the state of Washington. In December we held our annual Christmas Party at Kristall's and handed out our chapter awards and installed the 2010 executive officers. We will be expanding our grant program and be installing "Salmon in the Classroom" fish tanks at the 4th grade level in the Entiat School system in 2010.

I am sure that 2010 will bring new challenges for ICTU. Our chapter is alive and healthy and we look forward to 2010 with enthusiasm and anticipation of further challenges as we strive for improving conservation of our cold water fisheries. Our meetings on the second Wednesday of the month are filled with excellent presentations and should be very interesting. We hope to increase our membership and we are working to establish a new TU chapter in the Okanogan Valley. More information will be forthcoming on this possibility in February or March. Remember to conserve and protect our cold-water fisheries so that future generations can enjoy fishing in our lakes and streams.

 

 

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